Elections, Early Voting, Voter ID

HCS HBs 48 & 216 (See also HJR 5)

Sponsored by Representative Dugger (R), District 141
Introduced 1-11-2013
2/14/2013: Reported to the Senate and First Read (S)
2/20/2013 Second read and referred: Senate Financial and Governmental Organizations and Elections(S)
2/28/2013 Public Hearing Scheduled (S) – Monday, March 4, 2013, 2:00pm, Senate Lounge
3/04/2013 Public Hearing Held (S)

Photo Identification Requirement for Elections
This bill requires a person to submit a specified form of photo identification in order to vote in a public election. In its main provisions, the bill: (1) Specifies that a person seeking to vote in a public election must establish his or her identity and eligibility to vote as a United States citizen lawfully residing in this state by presenting to election officials one of the specified forms of personal identification that contains his or her photograph. All costs incurred by an election authority to implement the photo identification requirement must be reimbursed by the state. If there is no state appropriation and distribution of funds, the election authority must not enforce the photo identification requirement; (2) Allows an individual to vote by casting a provisional ballot after signing an affidavit if he or she does not possess a required form of personal identification because of a physical or mental disability or handicap, the inability to pay for a birth certificate or other documentation necessary to obtain the identification required to vote, or a sincere religious belief against these forms of personal identification or the person was born on or before January 1, 1941; (3) Allows an individual to vote by casting a provisional ballot if he or she lacks photographic identification and then return to the election authority within three days after the election with a valid form of identification so that the provisional ballot may be counted; (4) Requires the state and all fee offices to provide at no cost at least one form of personal identification required to vote to a qualified individual who does not already possess the required identification and desires the identification in order to vote; and (5) Removes the provision allowing a disabled or elderly person to obtain a nondriver’s license photo identification through a mobile processing system operated by the Department of Revenue. The bill will become effective only upon voter approval of a constitutional amendment that authorizes the General Assembly to enact laws regarding photo identification requirements for elections.

HJR 12

Sponsored by Stanly Cox (R), District 52

1/17/2013 – H 144 Introduced and Read First Time (H)
1/22/2013 – H 154 Read Second Time (H)
1/31/2013 – H 240 Referred: Elections(H)
2/05/2013 – Public Hearing Completed (H)
2/05/2013 – Executive Session Completed (H)
2/05/2013 – HCS Voted Do Pass (H)
2/06/2013 – H 286 HCS Reported Do Pass

Upon voter approval, this constitutional amendment specifies that a person seeking to vote in person in a public election may be required by general law to identify himself or herself and verify his or her qualifications as a United States citizen and a Missouri resident by providing election officials with a form of identification that may include requiring valid government-issued photo identification. Exceptions to the identification requirement may also be provided for by general law.

SB 94 (see also SB 145)

Sponsored by Senator Justus (D), District 10
12-1-12 – Pre-filed
1-14-13 – Second Read
2/18/2013 – Hearing Conducted S Financial and Governmental Organizations and Elections Committee

Creates early voting system
This act creates a system to allow voters to cast advance ballots at central voting locations and satellite sites. The advance voting period will begin the third Wednesday prior to an election and shall be conducted between 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. and until 12:00 p.m. on Saturdays. The election authority shall consider factors including geographic location and demographics of the registered voters from the previous election to ensure nondiscrimination and provide adequate notice of the central locations and the satellite sites that are chosen.

Election authorities shall create lists of names and addresses of each voter casting an advance ballot and such lists shall be confidential until 8:00 a.m. on the Friday before the election. Upon expiration of the confidential period, authorized individuals are entitled to view the lists and the election authority may make copies of the lists available to those individuals for a fee. A violation of confidentiality is a class four election offense. Provisions regarding advance voting become effective January 1, 2014.

Currently, in certain jurisdictions, candidates, campaign committees, and those authorized by a candidate are entitled to view lists of applications for absentee ballots before 8 A.M. on the Friday prior to the election and in other jurisdictions, that information is kept confidential until after 8 A.M. on the Friday prior to the election. Under this act, those lists in all jurisdictions are to remain confidential until after 8 A.M. on the Friday prior to the election. Confidentiality regarding lists of information regarding voters who cast advanced ballots shall be treated the same way. At 8 A.M. on the Friday prior to the election, candidates, campaign committee representatives, persons with written authorization from a candidate, any person who has applied for an absentee ballot, or any person who has cast an advance ballot may view the lists. Persons who knowingly disclose confidential information shall be guilty of a class four election offense.

This act is similar to SB 859 (2006), SB 37 (2007), SB 1251 (2008), SB 523 (2009), SB 21 (2009), SB 651 (2010), SB 3 (2011), SB 105 (2011), HB 1438 (2012), and SB 603 (2012).

SJR 6

Sponsored by Will Kraus (R), District 8
2/11/2013 – Voted Do Pass S Financial and Governmental Organizations and Elections Committee

Upon voter approval, this constitutional amendment provides that a voter seeking to vote in person may be required by general law to identify himself or herself as a United States Citizen and a resident of the state by producing valid, government-issued photo identification. Exceptions may be provided for by general law.

This resolution is similar to HJR 64 (2010), HCS#2/SJR 2 (2011), HJR 92 (2012), and HCS/HJR 89 (2012).

SB 555

Sponsored by Senator Nasheed (D), District 5
12/1/2013: Pre-filed
Effective Date: August 28, 2014

This act bars General Assembly members and their staff and family from accepting travel and tickets for sporting events and concerts from lobbyists and bars lobbyists from delivering such items to such individuals.

This act imposes contribution limits of $2,600 for any candidate in any election. The limits shall be increased in each odd-numbered year based upon fluctuations in the Consumer Price Index.Contributions from persons under 14 years old shall be considered to be made by his or her parents or guardians.Committees that accept or give contributions in violation of the limits shall be subject to a surcharge of $1,000 plus an amount equal to the contribution per non-allowable contribution.

This act is similar to HB 633 (2009), HB 687 (2009), SB 389 (2009), SB 270 (2009), SB 648 (2010),SB 546 (2012), SB 825 (2012), SB 227 (2013), SB 181 (2013), and SB 92 (2013).

HB 188

Sponsored by Pat Conway (D), District 10

1/16/2013 – H 134 Introduced and Read First Time (H)
1/17/2013- H 142 Read Second Time (H)
2/14/2013 – H 357 Referred: Elections(H)
3/12/2013 – Public Hearing Completed (H)

This bill allows any voter to vote with an absentee ballot in any election without being required to state a reason for voting absentee.

HB 848

Sponsored by Myron Neth (R), District 17

3/12/2013 – H 600 Introduced and Read First Time (H)
3/13/2013 – H 608 Read Second Time (H)
3/28/2013 – H 764 Referred: Elections (H)

This bill allows early voting at a central voting location for all elections starting the sixth Tuesday prior to an election or within 14 days of certification of the candidate’s names under Section 115.125, RSMo. The regular staff of an election authority may conduct early voting in place of election judges, but all other rules for election procedures must remain the same. The ballots will be cast on the election authority’s electronic voting system and will be counted on or after election day. All costs will be reimbursed from general revenue or the Secretary of State’s funds, and if no reimbursement occurs, the early voting provisions of the bill will be void.

For all November presidential elections or other elections designated by an election authority, satellite voting sites for early voting may be used in addition to a central voting location. One satellite voting site is required for an election authority with more than 175,000 registered voters in their jurisdiction but is discretionary for a jurisdiction with fewer than 175,000 registered voters. Satellite sites must be open at least four hours per day and eight continuous hours on weekends for at least 14 consecutive or nonconsecutive days prior to the election. Satellite sites will close at the close of regular business hours the Wednesday prior to an election. If satellite sites are used, the election authority must notify voters of the dates, location, and hours of operation of the central voting location and any satellite site in the office of the authority, on its website, or by other methods.

Intrastate new residents and former residents must use early voting instead of voting by absentee ballot. The process for verifying information and the affidavit required in order to vote will remain the same for new voters.

HB 682

Sponsored by Stacey Newman (D), District 87

2/20/2013 – H 413 Introduced and Read First Time (H)
2/25/2013 – H 421 Read Second Time (H)

Beginning January 1, 2014, this bill allows voters to cast advance ballots starting on the third Wednesday before any election. Any registered voter may vote by advance ballot at the central voting location designated by the election authority. Voting will be allowed on weekdays from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. and on Saturdays until 12:00 p.m. through the close of regular business hours on the Wednesday before the election.

For federal elections, up to six satellite voting sites must be provided by the election authority with one satellite site established for every 50,000 registered voters. For other elections, the use of satellite sites is discretionary. An election authority must provide information about the central voting location and the satellite sites on its web site and at its offices and may publicize the location of the other sites through other means. These satellite sites will be subject to the supervision of election judges with at least one judge from each major political party at each site.

Any voter casting more than one type of ballot during the same election will be guilty of a class one election offense. The disclosure of voting lists containing the names of those using either advance ballots or absentee ballots to unauthorized persons will be a class four election offense. Persons voting by advance ballot will receive the same protections as those voting by absentee ballot.

The bill also increases from 25 to 100 feet of a polling place’s outer door the prohibition of exit polling, surveying, sampling, electioneering, distributing election literature, posting signs, or placing vehicles bearing signs regarding any candidate or question on an election day.

Certain provisions requiring the election authority to record information regarding advance and absentee ballots in St. Louis and Kansas City and the counties of Jackson and St. Louis are removed to require all election authorities to record the information.

HB 660

Sponsored by Nick Marshall (R), District 13

2/20/2013 – H 412 Introduced and Read First Time (H)
2/25/2013 – H 421 Read Second Time (H)

The bill establishes the Safe and Fair Elections Act. In its main provisions the bill:

(1) Requires a person registering to vote to present a form of personal identification that provides evidence of United States citizenship. All forms presented must be kept confidential by the election authority. The acceptable forms of identification are specified in the bill. An applicant can provide other evidence of citizenship to the Secretary of State who must determine if the evidence is sufficient for registration;

(2) Allows an applicant who has been denied due to a marital or gender based name change to submit an affidavit stating the reason for the name change and affirming that the applicant is the person reflected in the document;

(3) Exempts a person who is registered to vote on the effective date of the bill from being required to present an identification to prove his or her citizenship;

(4) Establishes the State Election Board consisting of the Secretary of State, Attorney General, and Lieutenant Governor. The board will assess the information and documentation provided by an applicant as evidence of his or her citizenship. An applicant has the right to appeal the board’s determination based on federal law 8 U.S.C. Section 1503 and the board’s judgment of insufficient evidence will be reversed if the applicant obtains a declaratory judgment under that federal law;

(5) Requires the Department of Health and Senior Services to provide a free certified copy of a birth certificate upon the request of any person 17 years of age or older to meet the personal identification requirement. Each county must designate an office to help a person obtain a free certified copy of his or her birth certificate;

(6) Requires applicants for an absentee ballot to provide a current drivers or non-drivers license or a photocopy of any identification required for voting. An election authority is prohibited from providing an absentee ballot by mail unless the signature of the person requesting the ballot is verified. An election authority must contact an applicant if the absentee ballot request is denied to allow them to provide the correct identification or a matching signature;

(7) Allows a voter to have a designated person return an absentee ballot if the person is specified in writing at the time the voter requests an absentee ballot. Currently, a relative of the voter within the second degree of consanguinity or affinity may return the ballot. Any person designated by the voter to return the absentee ballot must sign a statement that he or she has not exercised any undue influence on the voting decisions of the voter than that he or she agrees to deliver the ballot as directed by the voter;

(8) Requires a voter to establish his or her identity at a polling place by providing specified documentation. Voters without the proper identification may vote a provisional ballot and then supply the correct identification to the verification board of the local election authority; and

(9) Exempts a person with a permanent disability: uniformed service and merchant marine members, their spouses, and dependents absent from the jurisdiction; and a person with religious beliefs opposed to photographic identification from the photographic identification requirement.

SB 27

Sponsored by Senator Kraus (R), District 8

The act establishes identification requirements for voting.

Voters shall produce a non-expired Missouri driver’s license; a non-expired or non-expiring Missouri non-driver’s license; any identification containing a photograph issued by the Missouri National Guard, the United States armed forces, or the United States Department of Veterans Affairs; or a document issued by the United States or the state of Missouri containing the name of the voter which substantially conforms to the most recent signature in the individual’s voter registration records, a photograph, and an expiration date or if expired, the expiration is after the date of the most recent general election.

Those appearing without identification who are unable to obtain one because of a physical or mental disability, an inability to pay for a document necessary to obtain the required identification, a religious belief against forms of identification or the voter was born before January 1, 1941, shall be allowed to vote a provisional ballot, provided the election authority can verify the identity of the individual by comparing the individual’s signature to the signature on file with the election authority.

All voters whose identity cannot be established are allowed to cast a provisional ballot which shall not be counted unless the voter returns and provides proper identification.

All costs incurred by the election authority associated with implementing the new identification requirements shall be reimbursed from the general revenue upon appropriation.

The election authority shall provide advance notice of the identification requirements to be included in the election authority’s elections notices.

The state shall provide at least one form of identification required to vote at no cost to the voter.

The act requires that provisional ballots be available for all elections except for absentee voting.

This act is contingent on the passage of a constitutional amendment establishing voter photo identification for elections.

This act is similar to SB 1014 (2006), SB 523 (2009), HB 1966 (2010), HCS#2/SB 3 (2011), SCS/HB 1104 (2012), and SCS/SB 442 (2012).

SB 555

Sponsored by Senator Nasheed (D), District 5
12/1/2013: Pre-filed
Effective Date: August 28, 2014

This act bars General Assembly members and their staff and family from accepting travel and tickets for sporting events and concerts from lobbyists and bars lobbyists from delivering such items to such individuals.

This act imposes contribution limits of $2,600 for any candidate in any election. The limits shall be increased in each odd-numbered year based upon fluctuations in the Consumer Price Index.Contributions from persons under 14 years old shall be considered to be made by his or her parents or guardians.Committees that accept or give contributions in violation of the limits shall be subject to a surcharge of $1,000 plus an amount equal to the contribution per non-allowable contribution.

This act is similar to HB 633 (2009), HB 687 (2009), SB 389 (2009), SB 270 (2009), SB 648 (2010),SB 546 (2012), SB 825 (2012), SB 227 (2013), SB 181 (2013), and SB 92 (2013).